Those who know me best know that I’m the kind of guy who likes to have people around me… I’m not the kind of person who needs (or wants) a lot of time on his own. I tend to get restless if I’m left to my own devices and I think it’s because I bore me.

In the past, I’ve done a fair amount of travelling on my own only to meet up with friends or family at my destination, and I’ve really enjoyed that. Maybe it’s because I’m moving around and really watching my surroundings, at least I hope it is.

Anyways, for the past week or so I’ve been considering taking a few days later this summer and going on a solo canoe trip. Maybe take some holidays and make a long weekend and take a short trek into the interior of Algonquin. So long as I pack VERY lightly and keep the portages to a minimum, I think I could have a really good time.

As a test of my resolve when it comes to weening myself off my social dependence, I’m going to be spending a week alone at my cottage in August. My sister, brother-in-law and nephew are coming out to stay with my parents and I’m going to stay at the Royal Estate and babysit the family dog. After a week in the wilderness with an insane hound, I figure I’ll have a pretty good idea of how much solitude I can take.

Has anyone out there ever done a solo canoe trip? Any advice for the uninitiated? Will I go insane after 12 hours alone in the bush?

4 Responses to “It’s Just a Three Hour Tour”
  1. take your bible… it just might come in handy

  2. Jamie Koch says:

    Be sure to bring alphabet soup with extra colons. Also be sure to watch for Sasquatch and David Suzuki (and Mary BZ?)!
    Oh, and (in)flammable socks.

  3. You can never have too many colons out in the bush. Especially with all that garlic. Ahem.

  4. I’ve been on plenty of solo canoeing trips, interior Algonquin stuff. First 3 or 4 times I got anxious/depressed/irritated/bored. But after that, it felt like a dam burst, and from then on, I thoroughly enjoy solo camping. I’m going next week for a few days albeit with my hound dog. Cures the ills busy city life brings, I say.

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